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Open Access Highly Accessed Research article

Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated autoimmune diseases induced by antithyroid drugs: comparison with idiopathic ANCA vasculitides

Branka Bonaci-Nikolic1*, Milos M Nikolic2, Sladjana Andrejevic1, Svetlana Zoric3 and Mirjana Bukilica4

Author Affiliations

1 Institute of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Clinical Centre of Serbia, Belgrade, Serbia and Montenegro

2 Institute of Dermatology, Clinical Centre of Serbia, Belgrade, Serbia and Montenegro

3 Institute of Endocrinology, Clinical Centre of Serbia, Belgrade, Serbia and Montenegro

4 Institute of Rheumatology, Belgrade, Serbia and Montenegro

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Arthritis Research & Therapy 2005, 7:R1072-R1081  doi:10.1186/ar1789

Published: 13 July 2005

Abstract

Clinical and serological profiles of idiopathic and drug-induced autoimmune diseases can be very similar. We compared data from idiopathic and antithyroid drug (ATD)-induced antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-positive patients. From 1993 to 2003, 2474 patients were tested for ANCA in the Laboratory for Allergy and Clinical Immunology in Belgrade. Out of 2474 patients, 72 (2.9%) were anti-proteinase 3 (PR3)- or anti-myeloperoxidase (MPO)-positive and their clinical and serological data were analyzed. The first group consisted of ANCA-associated idiopathic systemic vasculitis (ISV) diagnosed in 56/72 patients: 29 Wegener's granulomatosis (WG), 23 microscopic polyangiitis (MPA) and four Churg-Strauss syndrome. The second group consisted of 16/72 patients who became ANCA-positive during ATD therapy (12 receiving propylthiouracil and four receiving methimazole). We determined ANCA and antinuclear (ANA) antibodies by indirect immunofluorescence; PR3-ANCA, MPO-ANCA, anticardiolipin (aCL) and antihistone antibodies (AHA) by ELISA; and cryoglobulins by precipitation. Complement components C3 and C4, alpha-1 antitrypsin (α1 AT) and C reactive protein (CR-P) were measured by nephelometry. Renal lesions were present in 3/16 (18.8%) ATD-treated patients and in 42/56 (75%) ISV patients (p <0.001). Skin lesions occurred in 10/16 (62.5%) ATD-treated patients and 14/56 (25%) ISV patients (p <0.01). ATD-treated patients more frequently had MPO-ANCA, ANA, AHA, aCL, cryoglobulins and low C4 (p <0.01). ISV patients more frequently had low α1 AT (p = 0.059) and high CR-P (p <0.001). Of 16 ATD-treated patients, four had drug-induced ANCA vasculitis (three MPA and one WG), while 12 had lupus-like disease (LLD). Of 56 ISV patients, 13 died and eight developed terminal renal failure (TRF). There was no lethality in the ATD-treated group, but 1/16 with methimazole-induced MPA developed pulmonary-renal syndrome with progression to TRF. ANCA-positive ISV had a more severe course in comparison with ATD-induced ANCA-positive diseases. Clinically and serologically ANCA-positive ATD-treated patients can be divided into two groups: the first consisting of patients with drug-induced WG or MPA which resemble ISV and the second consisting of patients with LLD. Different serological profiles could help in the differential diagnosis and adequate therapeutic approach to ANCA-positive ATD-treated patients with symptoms of systemic disease.