Figure 1.

The profile of inflammatory cells in the skin of SSc patients. (A) Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining of consecutive serial sections showing typical pathologic changes of SSc (left panel); lymphocyte infiltration confirmed by CD3, CD4, CD8, CD20, and CD68 immunohistochemical staining in superficial dermis of patients with early SSc (right panels). (B) H&E staining (Left panel); lymphocyte infiltration confirmed by CD3, CD4, CD8, CD20, and CD68 immunohistochemical staining in superficial dermis of late SSc patients (right panels). (C) H&E staining (left panel); lymphocyte infiltration confirmed by CD3, CD4, CD8, CD20, and CD68 immunohistochemical staining in deep dermis of early SSc patients (right panels). (D) H&E staining (left panel); lymphocyte infiltration confirmed by CD3, CD4, CD8, CD20, and CD68 immunohistochemical staining in deep dermis of patients with late SSc (right panels). (E) Counts of CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, CD20+, and CD68+ lymphocytes in superficial dermis of skin (early SSc patients, n = 8; late SSc patients n = 5). (F) Counts of CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, CD20+, and CD68+ lymphocytes in deep dermis of skin (early SSc patients, n = 8; late SSc patients, n = 5). The positive cells in the surface were counted under × 400 magnification, and five randomly selected independent microscopic fields were counted for each sample to ensure that the data were representative and homogeneous. Scale bar, 100 μm.

Yang et al. Arthritis Research & Therapy 2014 16:R4   doi:10.1186/ar4430
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