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Open Access Research article

Interferon-gamma inducible protein-10 as a potential biomarker in localized scleroderma

Kelsey E Magee1, Christina E Kelsey1, Katherine L Kurzinski1, Jonhan Ho2, Logan R Mlakar3, Carol A Feghali-Bostwick3 and Kathryn S Torok1*

Author Affiliations

1 Division of Rheumatology, Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA 15224, USA

2 Department of Dermatology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA

3 Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA

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Arthritis Research & Therapy 2013, 15:R188  doi:10.1186/ar4378

Published: 13 November 2013

Abstract

Introduction

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the presence and levels of interferon-gamma inducible protein-10 (IP-10) in the plasma and skin of pediatric localized scleroderma (LS) patients compared to those of healthy pediatric controls and to determine if IP-10 levels correlate to clinical disease activity measures.

Methods

The presence of IP-10 in the plasma was analyzed using a Luminex panel in 69 pediatric patients with LS and compared to 71 healthy pediatric controls. Of these patients, five had available skin biopsy specimens with concurrent clinical and serological data during the active disease phase, which were used to analyze the presence and location of IP-10 in the skin by immunohistochemistry (IHC).

Results

IP-10 levels were significantly elevated in the plasma of LS patients compared to that of healthy controls and correlated to clinical disease activity measures in LS. Immunohistochemistry staining of IP-10 was present in the dermal infiltrate of LS patients and was similar to that found in psoriasis skin specimens, the positive disease control.

Conclusions

Elevation of IP-10 levels in the plasma compared to those of healthy controls and the presence of IP-10 staining in the affected skin of LS patients indicates that IP-10 is a potential biomarker in LS. Furthermore, significant elevation of IP-10 in LS patients with active versus inactive disease and correlations between IP-10 levels and standardized disease outcome measures of activity in LS strongly suggest that IP-10 may be a biomarker for disease activity in LS.