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Highly Accessed Review

Immunoglobulin class-switch recombination deficiencies

Anne Durandy* and Sven Kracker

Author affiliations

INSERM U768, Hôpital Necker-Enfants Malades, Paris, F-75015 France, Faculté de Médecine Université Paris Descartes, F-75006 Paris, France

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Citation and License

Arthritis Research & Therapy 2012, 14:218  doi:10.1186/ar3904

Published: 30 July 2012

Abstract

Immunoglobulin class-switch recombination deficiencies (Ig-CSR-Ds) are rare primary immunodeficiencies characterized by defective switched isotype (IgG/IgA/IgE) production. Depending on the molecular defect in question, the Ig-CSR-D may be combined with an impairment in somatic hypermutation (SHM). Some of the mechanisms underlying Ig-CSR and SHM have been described by studying natural mutants in humans. This approach has revealed that T cell-B cell interaction (resulting in CD40-mediated signaling), intrinsic B-cell mechanisms (activation-induced cytidine deaminase-induced DNA damage), and complex DNA repair machineries (including uracil-N-glycosylase and mismatch repair pathways) are all involved in class-switch recombination and SHM. However, several of the mechanisms required for full antibody maturation have yet to be defined. Elucidation of the molecular defects underlying the diverse set of Ig-CSR-Ds is essential for understanding Ig diversification and has prompted better definition of the clinical spectrum of diseases and the development of increasingly accurate diagnostic and therapeutic approaches.