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Open Access Research article

Resistin in idiopathic inflammatory myopathies

Mária Filková1, Hana Hulejová1, Klára Kuncová2, Lenka Pleštilová1, Lucie Andrés Cerezo1, Heřman Mann1, Martin Klein1, Josef Zámečník2, Steffen Gay3, Jiří Vencovský1 and Ladislav Šenolt1*

Author affiliations

1 Institute of Rheumatology, Department of Experimental Rheumatology of the 1st Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Na Slupi 4, Prague 2, 128 50, Czech Republic

2 Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, 2nd Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, V Úvalu 84, Prague 5, 150 06, Czech Republic

3 Center of Experimental Rheumatology, University Hospital Zurich, Gloriastrasse 23, Zurich, CH-8091, Switzerland

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Citation and License

Arthritis Research & Therapy 2012, 14:R111  doi:10.1186/ar3836

Published: 11 May 2012

Abstract

Introduction

The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the serum levels and local expression of resistin in patients with idiopathic inflammatory myopathies to controls, and to determine the relationship between resistin levels, inflammation and disease activity.

Methods

Serum resistin levels were determined in 42 patients with inflammatory myopathies and 27 healthy controls. The association among resistin levels, inflammation, global disease activity and muscle strength was examined. The expression of resistin in muscle tissues from patients with inflammatory myopathies and healthy controls was evaluated. Gene expression and protein release from resistin-stimulated muscle and mononuclear cells were assessed.

Results

In patients with inflammatory myopathies, the serum levels of resistin were significantly higher than those observed in controls (8.53 ± 6.84 vs. 4.54 ± 1.08 ng/ml, P < 0.0001) and correlated with C-reactive protein (CRP) levels (r = 0.328, P = 0.044) and myositis disease activity assessment visual analogue scales (MYOACT) (r = 0.382, P = 0.026). Stronger association was observed between the levels of serum resistin and CRP levels (r = 0.717, P = 0.037) as well as MYOACT (r = 0.798, P = 0.007), and there was a trend towards correlation between serum resistin and myoglobin levels (r = 0.650, P = 0.067) in anti-Jo-1 positive patients. Furthermore, in patients with dermatomyositis, serum resistin levels significantly correlated with MYOACT (r = 0.667, P = 0.001), creatine kinase (r = 0.739, P = 0.001) and myoglobin levels (r = 0.791, P = 0.0003) and showed a trend towards correlation with CRP levels (r = 0.447, P = 0.067). Resistin expression in muscle tissue was significantly higher in patients with inflammatory myopathies compared to controls, and resistin induced the expression of interleukins (IL)-1β and IL-6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 in mononuclear cells but not in myocytes.

Conclusions

The results of this study indicate that higher levels of serum resistin are associated with inflammation, higher global disease activity index and muscle injury in patients with myositis-specific anti-Jo-1 antibody and patients with dermatomyositis. Furthermore, up-regulation of resistin in muscle tissue and resistin-induced synthesis of pro-inflammatory cytokines in mononuclear cells suggest a potential role for resistin in the pathogenesis of inflammatory myopathies.