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Highly Accessed Review

Gout. Epidemiology of gout

Edward Roddy1* and Michael Doherty2

Author Affiliations

1 Arthritis Research UK Primary Care Centre, Primary Care Sciences, Keele University, Staffordshire ST5 5BG, UK

2 Academic Rheumatology, Clinical Sciences Building, City Hospital, Nottingham NG5 1PB, UK

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Arthritis Research & Therapy 2010, 12:223  doi:10.1186/ar3199

Published: 21 December 2010

Abstract

Gout is the most prevalent form of inflammatory arthropathy. Several studies suggest that its prevalence and incidence have risen in recent decades. Numerous risk factors for the development of gout have been established, including hyperuricaemia, genetic factors, dietary factors, alcohol consumption, metabolic syndrome, hypertension, obesity, diuretic use and chronic renal disease. Osteoarthritis predisposes to local crystal deposition. Gout appears to be an independent risk factor for all-cause mortality and cardiovascular mortality and morbidity, additional to the risk conferred by its association with traditional cardiovascular risk factors.