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Highly Accessed Review

The association between rheumatoid arthritis and periodontal disease

Jacqueline Detert1, Nicole Pischon2, Gerd R Burmester1 and Frank Buttgereit1*

Author affiliations

1 Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Mitte, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin, Germany

2 Department of Periodontology, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin, Germany

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Citation and License

Arthritis Research & Therapy 2010, 12:218  doi:10.1186/ar3106

Published: 22 October 2010

Abstract

Chronic, plaque-associated inflammation of the gingiva and the periodontium are among the most common oral diseases. Periodontitis (PD) is characterized by the inflammatory destruction of the periodontal attachment and alveolar bone, and its clinical appearance can be influenced by congenital as well as acquired factors. The existence of a rheumatic or other inflammatory systemic disease may promote PD in both its emergence and progress. However, there is evidence that PD maintains systemic diseases. Nevertheless, many mechanisms in the pathogenesis have not yet been examined sufficiently, so that a final explanatory model is still under discussion, and we hereby present arguments in favor of this. In this review, we also discuss in detail the fact that oral bacterial infections and inflammation seem to be linked directly to the etiopathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). There are findings that support the hypothesis that oral infections play a role in RA pathogenesis. Of special importance are the impact of periodontal pathogens, such as Porphyromonas gingivalis on citrullination, and the association of PD in RA patients with seropositivity toward rheumatoid factor and the anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibody.